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Special Characters Reference

A list of special text codes you can use in events and string pictures.

Warning

Note that all special codes are case-sensitive, meaning whether you use lowercase or uppercase matters.

Insert Number or String

\v[XXX]: Replaced by the value of the XXXth Normal Variable.

\v?[XXX] Replaced by the XXXth variable in Spare Variable set ?. (Example: \v1[30])

\s[XXX]: Replaced by the XXXth String Variable.

\self[X] (*X from 0 to 9): Replaced by this Map Event’s SelfX variable.

\cself[XX] (*XX from 0 to 99): Replaced by this Common Event’s SelfX.
(0~4, 10-99 are number variables, 5-9 are strings)

\udb[A:B:C] (*A~C are numbers): Replaced by User DB Type A, Data B, Field C.

\cdb[A:B:C] (*A~C are numbers): Replaced by Variable DB Type A, Data B, Field C.

\sdb[A:B:C] (*A~C are numbers): Replaced by System DB Type A, Data B, Field C.

\sys[XXX]: Replaced by the XXXth System Variable.

\sysS[XXX]: Replaced by the XXXth System String.

Information

(Added 01/13/2009)
There is a priority order to special insertion codes, and if you follow it, you can nest them within each other. The priority order is:

Normal Variable \v < Spare Variable \v? < Self Variable \self < Common Self \cself < System Variable \sys < User DB \udb < Variable DB \cdb < System DB \sdb < String Variable \s < System String \sysS
You can put special codes of a lower rank inside of the [ ]s of a special code.
For instance, \cself[\v[12]] (\v < \cself) will properly call the Common Self of the number given by \v[12]. However, reversing it to \v[\cself[2]] does not work, because \cself has higher priority than \v.

Information

Due to this priority ranking, the DB-reading codes can include variable-reading codes like so: “\udb[3:\v[4]:\self[1]]”
However, for cases like \udb[\cdb[1:1:1]:2:3] (*\udb < \cdb, yet cdb is on the inside), where a higher-priority DB-reading code is put inside a DB-reading code, things will behave in an unstable manner.

Change Text Properties

\f[XX]: Changes font size for following text.

\m[XX]: Put at start of line to set maximum font size for line. Use when vertical text placement is getting messy.

\c[XX]: Changes font color. Colors are from System DB Type 12.

\E: Puts edges on following text (E for “edge”).

\N: Removes edges from following text (N for “normal”). (*This is the default state.)

\-[XX]:Shortens spacing of following text by XX pixels. If you use a negative value for XX, text spaces out more.

\font[X]: Changes the font to sub-font X. \font[0] reverts to default font.

\A+ … Assigns antialiasing to the following text. This makes text look smoother.

\A- … Disables antialiasing for the following text.

Text Display Control

\\ … Replaced by a normal \.

\! … Pauses message until button press.

\. … Waits 0.25 seconds.

\^ … Forces end of message display without input.

\> … Makes rest of line instantly appear.

\< … Stops instant display caused by >.

\mx[??] (*?? is a number) … Shifts position of following text by ?? pixels in the X direction.
Cleared on next line.

\my[??] (*?? is a number) … Shifts position of following text by ?? pixels in the Y direction.

\ax[??] (*?? is a number) … Forces internal anchor of following text to X position of ?? pixels.
Cleared on next line.

\ay[??](*?? is a number)…Forces internal anchor of following text to Y position of ?? pixels. If you want the textto overlap, inputting “■\ax[0]\ay[0]◆” will make the two symbols draw in the same place.

\sp[??] (*?? is a number) … Changes typing speed of following text to ?? characters per second.

\space[??] (*?? is a number) … Changes linebreak height to ?? pixels.

\r[Base String,Ruby Text] … Puts “Ruby Text” on top of “Base String.” Ruby text uses the color defined inSystem DB Type 12 (Text Colors), Data #13.

\i[num] (*From 0 to 999) … Shows “icon<num>.png” icon in message, from the BasicData folder in Data.Can be used to put icons in front of item names, or include special symbols in text. (Added in Ver. 1.03)

  • Always make the filenames use three digits after “icon”, such as “icon031.png”.
  • “icon” files will not display unless in the BasicData folder.
Usage example

\img[filename] (*Path relative to Data) … Shows the image “<filename>” in the Data folder.
Example:
\img[Picture/Test1.png]” loads Data\Picture\Test1.png. Behavior is the same as icons \i [ ] described above, but it may be slightly more intensive.
* If the file is not found, an error message will be shown.

<L> … Left-align following text. (Default)

<C> … Center-align following text.

<R> … Right-align following text.

Special Codes Usable in Database Field Names

Below are special codes that can be used in the Field names defined in Database “Type Settings.” They vary somewhat from the codes used in events and string pictures, so be careful.

These can be used in the boxes marked by the arrows

Insert Number or String

\udb[A:B:C] (*A~C are numbers): Replaced by User DB Type A, Data B, Field C.

\cdb[A:B:C] (*A~C are numbers): Replaced by Variable DB Type A, Data B, Field C.

\sdb[A:B:C] (*A~C are numbers): Replaced by System DB Type A, Data B, Field C.

\udb[A:B] (*A and B are numbers): Replaced by the Data ID of User DB Type A, Data B.

\cdb[A:B] (*A and B are numbers): Replaced by the Data ID of Variable DB Type A, Data B.

\sdb[A:B] (*A and B are numbers): Replaced by the Data ID of System DB Type A, Data B.

\d[X] (*X is a number): Replaced by the value of the Field number + X.(For example, if you write \d[4] in Field 12’s input box, it becomes 16.)
* These DB-reading special codes can also have \d[X] used inside of them, such as “\udb[3:\d[0]]”. However, cases like \udb[\cdb[1:1:1]:2:3] where a DB-reading code is inside another DB-reading code will be unstable, so please refrain from doing this.

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